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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
this week in fiscal cliff negotiations. and late today mr. obama said the administration will recognize a coalition of syrian opposition groups. online, we look at a truly long- term reporting assignment. hari sreenivasan has more. >> sreenivasan: paul salopek is about to spend seven years tracing the ancient path of human migration around the globe. we talked about his route, the shoes he'll wear, and his emphasis on "slow journalism." and what's it like to have breast cancer in the poorest nation in the western hemisphere? that's next from our series with "pri's the world" on cancer in the developing world. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. ray? >> suarez: and that's the newshour for tonight. on wednesday, we'll look at the world in the year 2030. one intelligence report projects china will be on top economically, and the u.s. will be energy-independent. i'm ray suarez. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. and
tonight, we'll update negotiations aimed at avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> ifill: then, we look at michigan's debate over right-to- work laws which would prevent labor unions from requiring membership. >> woodruff: paul solman explores the tax deductions that could be on the chopping block in the quest to bring down the deficit. >> we estimate $1.1 trillion a year in revenue the government gives up because of all the tax breaks. that's enough to solve the revenue problem but it's not going to happen. >> ifill: ray suarez has a newsmaker interview with secretary of homeland security janet napolitano. >> you can discuss border security and immigration reform simultaneously now. we don't have to this kind of first this and then that. at this point they actually go together. >> woodruff: special correspondent rick karr reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a
, after resuming negotiations with the speaker of the house on a fiscal cliff agreement. and egypt's islamist president deployed troops outside the presidential palace amid growing protests against a referendum on a new constitution. and online we kick off a week- long look at how the developing world is tackling cancer. hari sreenivasan is here again. >> sreenivasan: more people die from cancer in low- and middle- income countries than from tuberculosis, hiv/aids, and malaria combined, but the fight against the deadly class of diseases has just begun there. see the first in our five-part series on our health page. and today our social security sage, larry kotlikoff, offers advice for outliving your money. that's on the business desk. and in our science roundup, find the perfect gift for your budding chemists and biologists, including a toy made from an owl's lunch. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll look at the raging political turmoil in egypt. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woo
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)